Piano + Keyboards



Digital pianos are also non-acoustic and do not have strings but use digital sampling technology to reproduce the sound of each piano note. Digital pianos can include pedals, weighted keys, multiple voices, and MIDI interfaces. Early digital pianos tended to lack a full set of pedals but the synthesis software of later models such as the Yamaha YDP and Clavinova series synthesised the sympathetic vibration of the other strings and full pedal sets can now be replicated. The processing power of digital pianos has enabled highly realistic pianos using multi-gigabyte piano sample sets with as many as ninety recordings, each lasting many seconds, for each key under different conditions. Additional samples emulate sympathetic resonance, key release, the drop of the dampers, and simulations of techniques such as re-pedalling.

A keyboard instrument is a musical instrument played using a keyboard. The most common of these are the piano, organ, and various electronic keyboards, including synthesizers. Other keyboard instruments include celestas, which are struck idiophones operated by a keyboard, and carillons, which are usually housed in bell towers or belfries of churches or municipal buildings.

Today, the term keyboard often refers to keyboard-style synthesizers. Under the fingers of a sensitive performer, the keyboard may also be used to control dynamics, phrasing, shading, articulation, and other elements of expression—depending on the design and inherent capabilities of the instrument.

Another important use of the word keyboard is in historical musicology, where it means an instrument whose identity cannot be firmly established. Particularly in the 18th century, the harpsichord, the clavichord, and the early piano were in competition, and the same piece might be played on more than one. Hence in a phrase like "Mozart excelled as a keyboard player" the word keyboard is usefully noncommittal.

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Yamaha P45 88 Key Digital Piano Black
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